Weed Eating

dandelion_1
Weeds. Most weeds are deemed weeds because they are not very pretty and they seem aggressive. However, weeds grow in disturbed areas or areas of compacted soil. We as humans have created many disturbed areas, therefore, creating a perfect habitat for weeds. There is a succession in the plant world. Weeds are the first step in this succession. They inhabit these disturbed areas, till the soil with their roots, bring in nutrients and eventually make it habitable for other plants to grow. The more we try to eradicate weeds with machines and chemicals, the more we are aiding an area for weeds to thrive.

I must say, there are some weeds that are aggressive. The cattle industry has seemed to create the weed list due to the assumption that it is harmful to their livestock or simply that the livestock or wildlife will not eat these weeds. True, there are some that are toxic to livestock and wildlife, however, there are several household plants that are toxic to animals and children. Most of the weeds on this noxious weed list are edible or medicinal plants! If we could figure out a way to harvest these plants for their use and to keep their numbers under control then I think a harmony can be created.

Dandelions are everywhere. I remember how fun it was to make a wish on a dandelion. Their flowers, when sucked, have a hint of honey. Their leaves, when eaten in a salad, are a bit bitter, but full of vitality. The great thing about eating these weeds from your yard or local park or a friend’s home, is the vibration you get from eating something fresh and straight from the ground. Nothing is lost in transporting it from some country to your local grocer. You will vibrate.

Dandelions are one of the most popular liver revitalizers. The root makes an excellent tea, and has a cooling quality that an inflamed liver would truly appreciate. Dandelion is a source of potassium, sodium, calcium, iron and phosphorus. The leaves are a richer source of Vitamin A than carrots. The root contains bitter glycosides, tannins, triterpenes, sterols, volatile oil, choline, asparagin and inulin. Anything that is bitter or considered a bitters is good for your liver and digestion!

So, this little weed, we all are sure to know, is jam packed with vitamins and minerals and cleansing properties. Imagine what else we could be eating from our yards or parks; as long as nothing is being sprayed. There is a whole garden available, which needs no tending or planting. How much easier could it be?

Here is a recipe for Dandelion Pesto, provided by Turtle Lake Refuge in Durango, Colorado.
1 cup cashews, pine nuts or walnuts
3 cups chopped dandelion greens
1/2 cup olive oil
3 cups chopped basil or oregano
3 cups sorrel greens
3 cloves garlic
2 lemons, juiced
1 tsp, sea salt
1 cup divine water

Blend and add to anything and enjoy! Be open to mixing up the recipe. I just used what I had at home and made it according to my own taste.

Enjoy!

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2 Comments

Filed under Agriculture, Conscious Consumption, Natural Health, Permaculture, Urban Sustainability, waste minimization

2 responses to “Weed Eating

  1. The guy at our local organic nursery was recommending using certain varieties of plants as low ground cover instead of mulch that work to both keep the ground moist and keep weeds out. Unfortunately I can’t remember off the top of my head what varieties those were, but I bet any knowledgeable nursery could recommend something!

    Also, vinegar works as a great all-natural weed killer. We got some highly concentrated organic vinegar from that same local nursery that worked really well for us.

    • kdmuni

      nice to know on the vinegar. i am trying to talk my boss into an alternative. groundcovers are awesome. there are so many and it all depends on your site. thyme, so many varieties, is super drought tolerant and woolly thyme can handle heavy foot traffic. it looks bad ass. a lot of groundcovers like clover and legumes are nitrogen fixers as well. i think the main goal is to mimic nature. leaves stay on the ground and decompose. acting as a groundcover and then compost. awesome! there are some bad ass sedum groundcovers, but those can not be stepped on. anyway, the list is endless. colors, texture!!! so much fun. thanks for the note
      kasi

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